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want to make prior to making any real conclusions, probably is there a connection to pakistan unofficial or otherwise. is this the first attack that we're going to see and the only attack we're going to see? are there going to be more attacks in mumbai or other placesment third and probably most important, how does this affect pakistani-indian relations. that has been a border and boiling point for decades, the indiana yeah and pakistani relations. we are talking to the pakistanis saying, your biggest problem is not india, it's in pakistan and the taliban and terrorist attacks about you. the pakistanis always say, no, no it's india. who you worry about, jon, whoever's fault this is, this will increase tension between india and pakistan and those are two countries who have nuclear weapons. jon: we are looking from the state ride indian television. they are reporting eight people killed. that's what our viewers are seeing on the screen. this comes on the heels of the assassination of president karzai's brother in afghanistan. any likely correction there? >> reporter: not clear.
you, pat. the u.s. embassy under attack in syria. how is the united states responding? in pakistan they are burning our flags. and we are giving them millions. [ male announcer ] there's more barbeque time in every bag of kingsford charcoal. kingsford. slow down and grill. . >> our flag on fire, the u.s. embassy under attack as was the american ambassador's residence, people described as "thugs," reaching the wall of the embassy compound and breaking cameras and bonds and the united states is seeking compensation for the damage. meanwhile the united states announcing cutting back aid to pakistan. $800 million in military aid is being withheld after they decided to cancel vistas for 100 military trainers and my guest says the cuts are a good start. lieutenant colonel peters joins me. welcome. this is 40 percent of our annual aid to pakistan. should we retract the rest of it, as well? >>guest: i wish we could cut all aid to pakistan. pakistan is a rogue state. the pakistani military and security services are addicted to terror and we keep giving them money for another fix. but we can
laden's compound in pakistan and terror group is now within reach. david is live from kabul, afghanistan. >> reporter: the duly appointed defense secretary arrived here a few hours ago to find out for himself the situation on the ground here. he has brief talks with military officials including david petraeus and then he went straight into a meeting with the afghan president hamid karzai. their discussions included the transition of nato held areas of afghan control starting in july but also the drawdown of u.s. troops over the next year. he says he hopes to drive the taliban into peace talks over that period. he also said he was upbeat about prospects of defeating al-qaeda if they can capture and kill remaining leaders. >> i would say somewhere around 10 to 20 key leaders, between pakistan, yemen, so somalia and north africa, if we can go after them, i think we really can strategically defeat al-qaeda. >> he also said the targeting of leaders such as the al-qaeda chief ayman al-zawahri continues to limit their ability to conduct attacks. he may just go well over the border in pakistan's
terrorist through security. even with bin laden's debt at the compound in may, pakistan is the base for the al-qaeda core leadership, including ayad allawi the egyptian doctor who replaced the al-qaeda leader. pakistan's ability to track known and suspected terrorists is substandard. >> it is stunning that pakistan which is supposed to be our ally in the war against terrorism does not even share finger print data within the own government. >> while information sharing and passport security improved in the u.s., former homeland security official says the disparity overseas remains a serious problem. >> the travel documents are the same as weapons, terrorists that can't carry off the plot without them. if i give us a grade abroad with the partners, some of is it out of our control, we're probably closer to a "c." >> some former intelligence officials say the u.s. should use leverage to encourage standards. for some nations it's resource problems. for otherssh it's refusal to cooperate. >> bret: thank you. the speaker of the house joins me live in studio exclusively after the break. [
pakistan a strong message >> the pakistani relationship is difficult but it must be made to work overtime. but until we get through these difficulties, we will hold back some of the many that the american taxpayers have committed to give. >> some $800 million? >> yep. >> it's a lot of cash but is it a political move. our next guest called out the pakistani government in 2006 claiming they knew osama bin laden in's location. peter thompson joins me. he's the author of the new book "the wars of afghanistan." good to see you. >> thank you. >> i want to get your thoughts we reported that the half-brother of huh mean karzai in afghanistan has been assassinated. how does that affect the relationships? >> he was assassinated by the taliban. this reflects assistmatic policy of the taliban and their isi handlers, the intelligence organization is i think behind this as well. and also al-qaeda. this policy is a tool to eliminate real and potential enemies of the islamists they want to reimplant back in cob he will. >> so this is a blow to the u.s. in afghanistan? >> yes, and also the destabilization
. and most recently, kashmiri, operational commander was reportedly killed in pakistan. at the recent news conference, the president insisted gaining intelligence remained the priority. >> that mitigates against this danger that you are suggesting that our main goal is going to be to kill the individuals as opposed to potentially capturing them. >> with no new high-value captures, some say intelligence a long-term casualty. >> because of the reluck tance of the administration, you have pushed this program to an area where you either have to kill someone or let them go. >> just last week, the obama administration said that the cornerstone of the new counterterrorism strategy is surgical strife. the upcoming campaign in yemen and somalia is similar if not identical to the drone campaign of tribal areas of pakistan. >> shannon: thank you. >> you're welcome. >> shannon: lawyer for french lovellis novelist says sl fire criminal complaint tuesday accusing dominique strauss-kahn of rain. she said the former fund fund chief tried to undress her in 2002 and it's reported strauss-kahn will try to su
. taliban, elements in pakistan use governmental power to support terrorism by muslims. left wing press wants to compare nuts like breivik and mcvey to state sponsored terrorism and worldwide jihad. again, dishonest and insane. the second reason the ricial media is pushing the christian angle is they don't like christians very much because we are too judgmental. many christians oppose abortion. gay marriage, and legalized narcotics. secular left causes. the media understands the often based on religion. they want to diminish christianity and highlighting so-called christian-based terror is a way to do that. the primary threat to this world comes from islamic terrorism. iran is a major problem. if the country gets nuclear weapons and it's desperately frying to. does anyone doubt those weapons would be used. a muslim in pakistan exported nuclear technology to north korea. and muslim suicide bombers below innocent people up almost every day. yet, once again the liberal media wants you to fear christian terrorists going forward when jihad is mentioned, you know breivik and mcvey will enter
the speckter of the isi in pakistan. >> this morning, new evidence suggests the bombs were planted at a bus shelter, also on a motorcycle and near a parked car. this really shows that these devices were designed to cause maximum casualties and they all went off within a span of 15 minutes, and again, the simultaneous nature of the attacks is a signature of terrorism, heather. heather: they did their jobs. catherine, what does this attack mean for the u.s.? >> well, look, immediately in washington, the focus went back to three years ago and these attacks in mumbai, that was a series of attacks orchestrated by ten pakistani militants armed with cell phones, hand guns and backpacks with explosives. analysts here say if this latest attack causes friction between india and pakistan that could be serious trouble for the u.s. let's listen: >> if the attack were a cause to try to provoke a crisis between india and pakistan that would have major implications for the united states. we do not want to see those two countries go into another crisis and perhaps fight another war, which they've done three
signal nato weakness, implications in places like syria and egypt and have implications like pakistan, as well. a lot rides on this more than just getting rid of khadafy, who yet again in past days has called for a return to terrorism something he used before and is threatening again. one more reason to get rid of him. >> gregg: last question -- there is a new study by the eisenhower research project and it concluded that u.s. involvement in afghanistan, pakistan and iraq has cost up to 4 trillion dollars over the past decade. your reaction to that? >> i think that study is badly flawed for a number of reasons. it's counting costs we would have incurred anyway for the existence of the military. it does focus on the potential explosion of medical costs. that is something i think even defenders of the defense department have said for some time that is an area of cost cutting we ought to be looking at. badly flawed but there are points worth taking into account going forward. >> gregg: unless anyone thinks we forgets, more than 6,000 american lives in various wars over the past decade, h
east of afghanistan. near the mountainous bored of pakistan. helicopters -- mountainous border of pakistan. the army range jerusalem target i --notice rangers. their target is an insurgents compound. the insurgents are heavily armed. intelligence indicates that a top al qaeda commander is in that compound. soon the helicopters touch down. and our rangers immediately come under fire. within minutes leroy, then a staff sergeant, and another soldier are pushing ahead into a court yard surround by high mud walls. and that's when the enemy opens up with their ak-47s. leroy is hit in both legs. he's bleeding badly. but he summons the strength to leave the other ranger to cover behind the chicken coop. he raidees for supports. he hurls a grenade at the enemy, giving cover to a third ranger to rushes to their aid. an enemy grenade explodes near by, wounding leroy's two comrades. then a second grenade lands. this time only a few feet away. every human impulse would tell someone to turn away. every soldier is trained to seek cover. that's what sergeants leroy petry could have done. inste
. pakistan is a good example of a country where information sharing among known and suspected terrorists is still lacking. >> it is stunning that pakistan, which is supposed to be our ally in the war against terrorism, does not even share fingerprint data within its own government. it doesn't share it with other pakistanis -- pakistani law enforcement agencies. that's a real problem. >> reporter: so the bottom line is that we can pour billions of dollars into our airport security but the overall system, of course, is only as good as the weakest link, gregg. gregg: the senator said this issue is more now. what has changed in that regard? >> >> reporter: let's take the example of the underwear bomber, it's a good example of a foreign national, in this case a nigerian, who came through yemen and on to amsterdam before he boarded a flight on christmas day in 2009, the american cleric, anwar al-awlaki, the first american on the kill or capture list was the first man there, abdulmutallab, and the bomb maker. >> the threat is far more diverge than it was -- diverse than it was a decade ago. now
and talked about, we're not worried about the al qaeda in pakistan because of the death of bin laden though we can't write off ayman al-zawahiri, the new leader of al qaeda in the pakistani tribal areas but he's worried about yemen and al qaeda in the arabian peninsula and also, somalia, across the waterways there where you have al-shabab. so, al qaeda has been morphing for quite some time, since 9/11 and i think he's saying the threats are moving in that direction and that he thinks and the administration believes that al qaeda, the one we think of from 9/11 purposes, usama bin laden and ayman al-zawahiri, may be on its death bed. alisyn: and how, in this new 2.0 version, how much of a threat is anwar al-awlaki. >> he's dangerous, he was here in the u.s. on 9/11 and left the u.s. and went to yemen and, is responsible probably for at least three major attacks or plots in the u.s., including the detroit under wear bombing. including the fort hood assaults, attacks and the ink cartridge capers, where they tried to modify ink printer cartridges as bombs and is considered probably the most dang
certainly hurt the al-qaeda terrorist organization, in pakistan and afghanistan. but anwar al-awlaki is alive and well in yemen and he is planning additional attacks against americans. is the franchise there now the lead in al-qaeda and how dangerous and what can we do? >> al-qaeda is somewhat diffuse in the islamist most of the time. yemen a fertile ground. it does seem to be emerging as headquarters of sorts. yemen as a state doesn't exist right now. it was an iffy topic when it had a president but it essentially doesn't right now. so al-qaeda finding an open door. president obama came out and said the tide of war is receding but nobody gave that message to the islamist terrorists. we this had the christmas day bombing, not the one on the flight but the on other one on fed ex shipments. >> gregg: speaking of terrorists let's talk about libya and moammar khadafy who says he is willing to talk to america but he refuses to give up his position. so what is the point of talking to the guy? >> this has been going for five months. people have said that khadafy is losing or close to
-qaida operatives still plot and plan across the border in pakistan. the taliban still try to regain lost ground, still intimidate and still assassinate as we just saw this past week about the brutal killing of president karzai's brother. hamid karzai trying to climb into his brother's grave last week is facing almost daily challenges to his rule. his brother was assassinated by a trusted bodyguard. a former governor and loyal political adviser to karzai was assassinate ned his apartment by two taliban gunman wearing bomb belts. >> in crushing heat and in numbing cold from the deserts of southern afghanistan to the peaks of the behind due kush. you have shown initiative, determination, innovative necessary and courage. you have been diplomats as well as warriors, statesman as well as soldiers. your performance as been in a word awesome. >> reporter: general petraeus handed over his command to marine general john allen. petraeus will retire from the army and particular over as the head of the cia in september. >> there will be tough days ahead. and i have no illusions about the challenges we will
Search Results 0 to 15 of about 16 (some duplicates have been removed)